Wreck Descriptions

0 to 60 Foot Dives

Mystery Dive
These are wrecks that we are investigating. They may offer an abundant source of artifacts and sea life.

Captain’s Choice
Any dive designated as Captain’s Choice will be a wreck chosen for it’s proximity or conditions dependent on another dive that day.

Lake Rawlings
20-60 ft. depth
Lake Rawlings was at one time a dry quarry mined for granite rock. In the late fifties, the miners hit an aquifer spring accidentally creating Lake Rawlings. The lake supports large-mouth bass, bream, bluegills, crayfish, and snails. Other features include two sunken buses, a van, several cars, the shell of the sailboat from the movie “The Replacements,” a submerged forest, a swim-through, a simulated kelp bed, a helicopter and huge boulders and granite walls.

Chesapeake Light Tower
40 ft. depth
Navigational Aid
Similar in construction to an offshore oil rig, the legs of the tower support a variety of invertebrate animals, as well as a diverse population of resident and transient fish species. There are also many spadefish and a number of small resident barracuda. Sandy bottom.

Tiger Wreck
60 ft. depth
Tanker
410 ft. long
Built: 1917
Sank: April 1, 1942
At the end of a voyage from Aruba to Norfolk transporting 65,000 barrels of Navy fuel oil, the Tiger was torpedoed in the middle of the night by a German U-boat. The crew abandoned ship and was rescued by the Cutter YP-52. Later that morning the Cutter Jackson found the Tiger still afloat and tried to tow her to port, to no avail. After six hours of towing the Tiger's bow finally ran aground and the Jackson cut loose her charge to continue her patrol. Tiger was later blown up. It lies on its starboard side in pieces. The three boilers and engine remain visible and attract tautog and sea bass. Jagged I-beams and hull plates on the ocean floor have very little relief, but make a great home for lobster.

Santore Wreck
60 ft. depth
Bulk Cargo Carrier
449 ft. long
Built: 1918
Sank: June 17, 1942 
While under charter by the War Shipping Administration, this ship carried valuable ores from Chile and returned with coal. The Santore was returning to Chile with her holds full of coal when the one remaining U-701 mine in a "clean" channel blew a hole in her port side. Sinking in less than three minutes, the crew had no time to launch life boats. Forty-three men were declared lost because of this catastrophe. Santore was later blown up. Little is left which distinguishes the remains as a vessel except for the boilers, masts, crow’s nest and gun mount. This is a nice dive for lobster and spearfishing.

Hanks Wreck
60 ft. depth
Surf Clam Boat
Sitting southeast of Rudee Inlet in 60 feet, this surf clam dredger has become a haven for fish and lobster. The boat is intact and leaning towards the port side. The shallow depth gives divers plenty of bottom time to view the abundant sea life. Good dive for beginning wreck divers.

4A Drydock  Buoy Barge
60 ft. depth
Wooden Drydock
140 ft. long
Semi-intact and upright with a ten-foot relief, this wreck is frequently inhabited by tautog.

Estridge
62 ft. depth
Oceangoing Tug
105 ft. long
Sunk: 2003
Sunk intentionally as part of the Virginia Artificial Reef System, the tug is intact and upright.

60 - 90 Foot Dives

Gulf Hustler Wreck
70 ft. depth
Surf Clam Boat
Intact and upright, this surf clam boat has equipment still onboard. The intact condition and large amount of relief provides a fun and save dive.

Artificial Reef
70 ft. depth
Part of the Virginia Coastal Reef System created by various state agencies, the artificial reef consists of landing craft, steel barges, tanks, tires, a scuttled boat, missile launchers and wooden dry docks.

E.B. Barge Wreck
70 ft. depth
Metal Barge
200 ft. long
This metal barge has 10-15 feet of relief with two landing craft—one on the stern and one on the bow. Tires are secured in the hold to attract wildlife. Sea bass, skates, rays and lobster are seen here.

Anthony Anne Wreck
70 ft. depth
Fishing Boat
80-90 ft. long
Broken in at least three pieces with 15 feet of relief, this boat was sunk as part of Virginia’s Artificial Reef System around 1996. The prop and wheel house are still visible and tautog, flounder and sea bass are seen here with regularity.

Steel Barge Wreck
74 ft. depth
Steel Barge
140 ft. long
This intact steel barge sits upright with 10-12 ft. of relief. A nearby tire field provides shelter for tautog, sea bass, and flounder.

Ricks Wreck
80 ft. depth
Surf Clam Boat
Intact commercial fishing trawler leaning towards the port side with some penetration for the trained wreck diver. Plenty of marine life and a good dive.

Wooden Dry Dock
75 ft. depth
Wooden Structure
150 ft. long
Part of the artificial reef system, the dry dock provides a substrate for a plethora of sea life.

Francis E. Powell/North Powell
80 ft. depth (mid)
90 ft. depth (stern)
Tanker
431 ft. long
Built: 1922
Sank: January 27, 1942
Torpedoed by U-130 during a World War II attempt to disrupt shipment of oil from Atreco, TX. During a towing attempt in rough seas, the tanker split into three sections, which lie in different areas. The Francis E. Powell or midsection is broken wreckage with no discernable shape. The site is home to numerous lobster and flounder. The N. Powell or stern rises 20 ft. off the bottom and extends 30 ft. out with a debris field of 150 ft.  The third section is rarely dived.

Monroe Wreck
80 ft. depth
Passenger-freighter
345 ft. long
Built: 1902
Sank: January 30, 1914
Collided with SS Nantucket in fog while on the way to New York carrying 140 sleeping passengers. The hull is in an advanced state of deterioration and tilts sharply to the starboard. Large debris field stretches off the starboard site. The stern rises 25 feet above sand level. The engine stands 20 feet high in the middle of the wreck.

Brass Spike Wreck
80 ft. depth
Wooden Barge
140 ft. long
Broken up with 10 ft. of relief, this wreck is aptly named for the numerous brass spikes available for scavenging. Also seen on this wreck are lobster, tautog and flounder.

Bell
80 ft. depth
Wooden Vessel
Two separate wrecks off the Eastern Shore. Highest point: boiler in back by engine: 12 ft. Sand Tiger sharks, flounder and lobster call this wreck home.

Carolina Breeze Wreck
85 ft. depth
Fishing Boat
90 ft. long
This fishing trawler went down in 2000. It sits upright and is mostly intact.

1800 Line Wreck (Consols)
90 ft. depth
Freighter
350 ft. long
Up-side-down, intact, 1912 vessel thought to be the Consols, which sank due to fire. Remote location allows for future artifact recovery and abundant sea life.

U85
90 ft. depth
U-boat
218 ft. long
Built: 1941
Sank : April 14, 1942
Shelled and depth-charged by USS Roper during WWII. Tilts 45 degrees with sand built up on the port side. Access is available to the forward torpedo room and control room with artifacts found forward and aft of the gallery.

100 to 130 Foot Dives

Lillian Luckenbach Wreck
100 ft. depth
Freighter
448 ft. long
Built: 1919
Sank: March 27, 1943
After colliding with the SS Cape Henlopen during World War II nighttime shipping confusion, the Lillian Luckenbach began to take on water on the port side where her plates were ruptured. No lives were lost, but the ship rolled onto her beam ends and sank. Sinking in a channel used by WWII convoys, she was bouyed and later demolished.

She still lies on her port side and the carton of truck tires, airplane wings, and assorted machinery are spread about her. This has created a home to all manner of marine life.

John Morgan Wreck
100 ft. depth
Liberty Ship
423 ft. long
Built: 1943
Sank: June1, 1943
After colliding with the SS Montana during high traffic nighttime shipping confusion, the John Morgan split in half and found its way to the bottom; claiming 18 lives. This ship sank carrying wartime cargo from Philadelphia to an Iranian port. The cargo of Ford truck, Caterpillar tractors, motorcycles, Willy's jeeps, Valentine tanks, machine guns, P-39 airplanes, and thousands of rounds of ammunition is still littered around the bottom. The midsection rises 30 ft. from sand level. The aft is split open with the sides blown out and deck collapsed. The stern is intact and visually impressive. There remain plenty of artifacts and FAT tautog for the diver who wants a momento and a good dinner.

Kurn Wreck
100ft. depth
Ocean tug
250 ft. long
The bow section of the wreck is upside down and the stern sits upright. There is also a landing craft in the vicinity.

Trepca Wreck
105ft. depth
Wooden wreck
250 ft. long
The ship is broken up with the bow rising 10 ft. above the sand. Sanded-in vessel with a large number of lobsters.

Benson
105 ft. depth
Tanker
465 ft. long
Built: 1922
Sank: April 7, 1942
Torpedoed by a U-552 while carrying 100,000 barrels of crude oil to New Jersey from Texas. The wreck is spread out along its keel, with the fantail and port side broken down and caved inward, and the starboard side rising 30 feet off the sand.

Schooner Wreck
105 ft. depth
Wooden wreck
150 ft. long
An unidentified 19th century sailing vessel with a multitude of artifacts to be recovered. Intact and in remarkably good shape for a ship of its age. Abundant sea life.

JSLW (Joe’s Secret Lobster Wreck)
105 ft. depth
Metal Barge
300 ft. long
Unidentified vessel with a large amount of wreckage to support a healthy population of lobsters and other sea life.

James Haviland Wreck
110 ft. depth
Liberty Ship
500 ft. long
Liberty ship, scuttled by various state agencies as part of the artificial reef system off the Virginia coast. Basically intact and upright, the deck rises 30 feet from the sand.

York (Norvana) Wreck
110 ft. depth
Freighter
253 ft. long
Built:1920
Sank: January 20, 1942
Torpedoed by U-66 en route from Cuba to Philadelphia. The ship was renamed Norvana after being turned over to the government. The bow is broken off and totally intact rising 40 ft. above the sand. The stern is broken off and twisted to port at 25 ft. above the sand. Due to its lack of exploration, many artifacts beckon to be discovered.

Edgar Clark
110 ft. depth
Liberty Ship
500 ft. long
Scuttled by various state agencies as part of the artificial reef system off the Virginia coast. Basically intact and upright, the deck rises 30 ft. from the sand.

Garrison Wreck
110 ft. depth
Liberty Ship
500 ft. long
This Liberty ship was scuttled by various state agencies as part of the artificial reef system off the Virginia coast.  Basically intact with the stern crushed, the deck rises 30 ft. from the sand.

Marine Electric Wreck
115 ft. depth
Passenger freighter
345 ft. long
Built: 1944
Sank: February 12, 1983
Foundered in 25-30-ft. seas while en route from Norfolk to Massachusetts carrying 24,800 tons of pulverized steam coal. Bow and stern are intact, separated by 240 feet and can be entered. The bow was upside-down. The stern lies on its starboard side.

Eureka Wreck
115 ft. depth
Coastwise freighter
351 ft. long
Built: 1884
Sank: May 6, 1888
Collided with SS Benison in fog while on its way to New York with a cargo of silks, satins, cloth, laces, and other merchandise. The ship had three decks and four schooner-rigged masts. Upright with plates collapsed outward and buried in sand. Highest point is the engine at 20 feet off the bottom. The bow is intact and listing to port.

Cuyohoga Wreck
115 ft. depth
Coast Guard Cutter
125 ft. long
Built: 1927
Sank: October 20, 1978
Eleven sailors died after this Coast Guard Cutter was struck and sunk by the MV Santa Cruz II (an Argentine freighter) during a training mission in the Chesapeake Bay. The vast amount of bedding, clothing, and equipment that was not properly stowed impeded the escape of the men below decks. After being raised for the investigation, it was decided that the boat was not worth repairing and was resunk. The wreck is upright, relatively intact, and easy to enter (although entanglement hazards exist). This dive is an excellent lobster wreck.

Webster Wreck
120 ft. depth
Liberty Ship
500 ft. long
Scuttled liberty ship; part of the artificial reef system off the Virginia coast. The hull is broken in two upright pieces rising 25-30 feet above the sand.

Chenango
140 ft. depth
Freighter
342 ft. long
Built: 1918
Sank: April 20, 1942
Torpedoed by a U-84 while carrying a cargo of manganese ore from Rio de Janeiro to Baltimore. The hull is broken in two in the shape of an “L.” Both parts are upside-down. The bow rises less than five feet above the sand with the stern rising 15 feet.